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What a New Hampshire DWI means for your driver’s license

On Behalf of | Aug 13, 2021 | Drunk Driving Defense

Drivers who get arrested for driving while intoxicated (DWI) in New Hampshire are at risk of many penalties. If they plead guilty or the courts convict them, they might need to spend time in jail or on probation. They will likely have to pay fines to the state in addition to paying for court costs.

As if those penalties weren’t harsh enough, those convicted of a DWI in New Hampshire can also expect to lose their driver’s license. The suspension of someone’s driving privileges is a standard penalty for DWI in New Hampshire. How long might you have to go without your license?

The more offenses on your record, the longer the suspension

Your previous driving record will have an impact on your sentence for a DWI charge. Someone who pleads guilty to or gets convicted of a first DWI will lose their license for between 90 days and two years.

The same penalty applies to second offenses, as well as first and second offenses for impaired driving involving drugs. For a third DWI, the suspension extends to five full years. After a fourth DWI conviction, the state can suspend someone’s license indefinitely. The state will also enforce out-of-state license revocations for drunk driving.

Drivers accused of a first offense might only have to go three months without their driving privileges. However, repeat offenders can expect that the judge presiding over the case will be less likely to be lenient regarding their licensing than a judge might be for someone accused of a first DWI.

How do you get your license back?

After the suspension period ends, you may not immediately get your full driving privileges back. If you have more than one DWI on your record or if there were aggravating factors involved in your first DWI case, the state may require that you install an ignition interlock device (IID). The state will add restrictions to your license that will limit you to driving only vehicles with an IID installed.

Losing your license is a significant hardship that not only affects your daily life and your budget but also your career. Defending yourself against a DWI charge could help you protect your license and your freedom.