A truck driver who is accused of causing a June 2019 accident in New Hampshire that claimed the lives of seven motorcyclists has allegedly admitted to regularly taking drugs before getting behind the wheel. Prosecutors made this claim on April 7 during a bail hearing. The judge denied the bail motion and ordered the man returned to custody. A blood sample drawn from the Massachusetts resident after the accident is said to have revealed traces of morphine, fentanyl and a chemical associated with cocaine. The man faces a raft of felony charges including multiple counts of DUI and negligent homicide. He has pleaded not guilty to all counts.

Defense attorney blames motorcyclist for crash

The man’s attorney had previously argued that bail was warranted because an independent accident investigator concluded that one of the motorcyclists killed in the crash was intoxicated at the time and caused the accident. Prosecutors responded by pointing out that the same report revealed that the man was straying between lanes when his pickup truck struck the motorcycle. They also said the man posed a threat to all road users because he was out on bail for another drunk driving offense when he lost control of his vehicle on a two-lane highway near Randolph.

Prosecutors say the man admitted to using drugs on the day of the crash

According to prosecutors, the man told police officers investigating the accident that he consumed half a gram of cocaine and two bags of heroin before setting off on his journey. Prosecutors also told the judge that the man is a Ukrainian national and could flee the country if released. His trial is scheduled to begin in November. He faces decades behind bars if he is convicted on all counts.

The importance of remaining silent

The Fifth Amendment gives DUI suspects the right to remain silent. If you are taken into custody on suspicion of drunk driving and questioned by police, experienced criminal defense attorneys would likely advise you to avail yourself of this right. Attorneys could suggest that any admissions should be made during plea negotiations in return for a more lenient sentence or reduced charges.